Fog

A bit of snow and moisture in the air made for a fog filled morning. I cranked up the defroster, switched on my headlights, and started off slowly. That’s why I didn’t see  . . .

Please leave a comment with your first 50 words on the topic “fog.”

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About first50

Writer and teacher who benefits from following the principles of writing practice set forth by Natalie Goldberg.
This entry was posted in Children's Writing Prompts, fiction, Writing prompt. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Fog

  1. Claire says:

    It was a foggy morning, but as she drove up the asphalt driveway of the art deco building, the fog clung to the ground like a shroud. It was so thick that you could actually cut it with a knife. The looming building came into view through the foggy haze as if it were an eerie apparition.

    She saw that there were no other cars parked in the parking lot at this time, so she decided to stay in the car, lock the doors and catch up on some reading. After a few minutes, she noticed that she had been reading the same sentence over and over, and it wasn’t making any sense. Her eyelids were beginning to get heavy and as she leaned her head against the car seat, a heavy thumping sound on the passenger side window startled her. Now wide awake, she looked around, but saw no one in site…

  2. Al Rohrer says:

    I’d been on the road for 13 hours, my muscles aching and my joints groaning, when I turned off of I57 onto Illinois State Route 154, taking a short cut home to Missouri. As I wheeled my big Peterbilt and it’s tanker trailer closer to Rend Lake, I could see a light fog laying on the water, wispy and faint. The pastel blues and oranges of the sunset in front of me blended with the soft fog cover. My right foot lifted slightly off the accelerator and I leaned back in my seat and let the tension…

  3. wailin says:

    The fog was not fog. It was thick, smokey, and made your lungs feel on fire. The cave was sticky warm, and why shouldn’t it be. A mile down and inside this mountain, where no man had tread for hundreds of years, the fear could be tasted in the stale waters that flowed through the aqueduct. Here there be dragons.

  4. Edwin Jeter says:

    Tools are needed to navigate fog. The instruments and lights we need to overcome foggy conditions represent what is necessary to handle adversity. AT certain times, in life, everyone needs to dig deep to find and identify coping skills needed to overcome unfavorable conditions. These are devices for overcoming fog.

  5. elle hayes says:

    It’s freaking cold in Oregon today. Cold I can deal with but the early morning fog that blocks the driveway, that lurks in the trees and grass and bushes and hides the dog poo in the park next door..that fog I can do without.

    I took Fiona, my scottie dog, for her morning trek thru the park-I was wearing my new fuzzy warm boots with fake fur all around. then, due to the damn fog, I squished in some large dogs leftovers. My new boots…well they need to be washed now. Thanks fog, thanks lazy dog owner-don’t you realize the park bureau supplies baggies for your dogs remains?

    Maybe I should suggest a writing exercise about dog poo.

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