General Bradley

I was in the right vicinity. I saw streets named General Nimitz, General Patton. I could not find General Bradley. The street signs were so hard to see, and some were obscured by leaves. I made a U-turn and started back in search of the right general’s name. Driving slowly, . . .

Please leave a comment with your first 50 words on the topic “General Bradley.”

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About first50

Writer and teacher who benefits from following the principles of writing practice set forth by Natalie Goldberg.
This entry was posted in Children's Writing Prompts, fiction, Writing prompt. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to General Bradley

  1. I walked the cement floor, tentatively, unsure if I should really be here. We just lost our dog, a beautiful lab so dear to my heart, a month ago. My ears tried to shut out the barking, begging of all the other dogs. Intake #01759, General Bradley sat and stared at me….

  2. Odd to have happened upon a reference to “generals” on this the second day of Women’s History Month. The men in charge…still. Waiting for more change and not for women generals.

  3. Claire says:

    The trip had been long so they decided to veer from the highway into the next small town. What appeared to be the main street was partly deserted at that time of the evening. Up ahead, they spotted what seemed to be a diner with a neon sign that read “General Bradley.”

    They parked in front of the establishment and looked out the passenger car window. It wasn’t a diner but a type of general store, and it was still open. They looked at each other, shrugged their shoulders and exited the car simultaneously.

    Once inside, they were greeted by a husky middle-aged man sporting a neatly waxed handle-bar mustache and nicely shaped mutton sideburns. “Welcome young ‘uns,” he said in a southern drawl, “I’m Gen’ral Bradley. What can I hep you with?”

  4. John Yeo says:

    General Bradley was a very fine man and a general dogsbody in the factory. All the staff liked Bradley always there with a cheerful grin and a willing pair of hands, unlike General George, who always had a long face and resented every request. Generally speaking both men did what they were paid for, quietly without medals.

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