The Neighborhood

The neighborhood was full of indistinguishable, look-alike houses. Scraggly, cheap trees planted by the builder struggled to survive drought and neglect in front of some the homes. The stucco cracked, the sidewalks buckled, the roofs leaked, but the people persisted, the people survived.

Please leave a comment with your first 50 words on the topic “the neighborhood.”

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About first50

Writer and teacher who benefits from following the principles of writing practice set forth by Natalie Goldberg.
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9 Responses to The Neighborhood

  1. Brenda Rayford says:

    I would drive by every weekend and sat at entrance of the neighborhood listening and looking for something that might deter me from purchasing a home her. It seemed to be the perfect neighborhood for a single mature lady. It was quiet with very few children. It looked like the perfect neighborhood for me.

  2. The neighborhood sat amidst the eastern bank of the Delaware River…….what was left of the neighborhood, I guess you could say. Old husks of 1940′s cars lie in tall grasses, while the houses stood, windows agape, doors wide open. Our hiking group tentatively entered one of the abandoned homes…..glancing about. “Should we try to go upstairs?” Dina whispered to me….”Hell, no, the boards of probably rotten and someone could fall through the floor and get seriously hurt.”

  3. Pingback: The neighborhood | tammanyandminsi

  4. Old Bill would walk along with a carrier bag full of rubbish he had collected during his daily walk. I couldn’t stand living in dirt he would say to everyone or anyone who enquired. I am devoted to cleaning up the neighbourhood. In reality he was always looking for something to keep and hoard.

  5. Charlie says:

    It’s always smaller, returning home. As a child, the neighborhood was a mighty canyon — two steep walls of sheer rock face a thousand feet high guarding the river at the bottom. Rounding the corner onto Walnut Street as an adult, the canyon walls had been replaced by red brick rowhomes. Where the river had once course now lay a pocked and dirty ribbon of asphalt barely wide enough for two cars.

  6. pampa says:

    It could have been Kolkata or Calcutta a hundred years back. The simple one storeyed house bang on the streets, facing the river ganges on the other side. Shuttered windows, the type made popular by the british. Red, shiny, polished cement floor.There was a spiral iron staircase behind for the rear entrance to the top floor. A simple verandah, narrow, with elaborate sun shades and pillars marked the front I liked the neighborhood for its quaint, old world charm……

  7. Edwin Jeter says:

    The Neighborhood looks great! Everyone survived a winter which kept them house bound for a while. Now, there is movement outside. My neighbors are walking, jogging, and talking. Most of them spend some time maintaining their property. This is good for the neighborhood; it is a great place to live.

  8. Claire says:

    The neighborhood had gone to the dogs. It was nothing like it used to be thirty years ago. She felt it was time to move out and look for other venues. That had been 11 years ago. She would occasionally visit and couldn’t wait to return back home. She definitely did not miss her old neighborhood and was grateful to be living in a quiet town far from the madness of a big city.

  9. willmadruga says:

    He is quite a strange guy. I don’t know. I guess no one has ever seen his face around here. No one goes there to welcome him either. It’s been what? A month? He doesn’t go outside.
    Windows are completely blinded during the day. At night I can only see a figure moving at the garden and a strange foxfire.
    I bet something bad is gonna happen soon in the neighborhood.

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