Small Town

Large cities are simply cobbled together small towns. People stay in their own neighborhoods most of the time. They go to the same walking path, the same grocery store, the same drug store week after week. People begin to recognize each other, speak, nod, know the faces of their neighbors. So why . . .

Please leave a comment with your first 50 words on the topic “small town.”

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Author: Virginia DeBolt

Writer and teacher who writes blogs about web education, writing practice, and pop culture.

3 thoughts on “Small Town”

  1. I grew up in a real small town. It was nothing like a big city cobbled together of many smaller units. We DID know our neighbors. And the mothers of children called each other so that our misbehavior reached home before we did.

  2. “Small town, big hell.” I heard my father evoke those words as we sat watching the film Ryan’s Daughter. I found that interesting and also very true because that’s what the protagonist in the movie figuratively went through. I saw this movie a very long time ago, but I remember that it had been compared to a loose adaptation of Flaubert’s Madame Bovary. Different era, different circumstances, but basically the same compelling motive.

  3. Small towns have warmth, charm and bonhomie. Everyone knows you and keeps a watchful eye on you as you grow.
    The house in front of my childhood home served as a bus shelter for us. The inmates used to come out to chat with us siblings, as we waited for the bus.Some times , we would be frantically called from our home, if the bus beat us, and stood idling.
    Recipes are swapped, as people take turns to cook dishes in each other’s homes, disguised as demonstrations.
    When my mother burnt her fingers while cooking in the kitchen, a neighbour made it a routine to come to our home , every evening and morning to help my grandmother out with making chapatis, for nearly one month.
    That,sums up what small town is all about. Caring and watching each other’s back.

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