Icy Wind

What little protection the bus kiosk offered against the icy wind was welcome. She looked up the street hopefully, praying for the sight of a lumbering bus coming her way. Rain, ice really, fell from the sky in tiny frozen droplets that coated everything with slick danger. Her cane wasn’t much help on the ice, but she had to make it from the shelter to the bus in one piece, Carrieanne’s life depended on it.

Please use the open space below to share your first 50 words on the topic “icy wind.”

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Author: Virginia DeBolt

Writer and teacher who writes blogs about web education, writing practice, and pop culture.

2 thoughts on “Icy Wind”

  1. It was their first winter living in the late 1800’s Cape across from the Bay. They had already withstood a fierce storm with seventy mile per hour winds which blew the chimney cap off in the middle of the night. It had blown off and hit the side of the house before landing on the ground. They heard the loud thumping sound but had no idea about what had caused it. It wasn’t until the next morning that they surveyed the damage in the gardens and found the chimney cap on the ground. This next winter storm was fierce and pelted sleet on everything in sight. The temperatures the next morning were frigid. The old windows on the second story were filmed over with frost so that you could not see out of them. A few days later they noticed that the old plaster walls under the windows began to bulge into the rooms. This was their first winter experience living in northern Maine near the Canadian border. It wouldn’t be their last.

  2. I don’t know what is worse an ice storm or icy wind. Sometimes they come together and the results are not good. A vivid picture still lingers in my mind 20 years after the fact. In our yard we had a 150 ft. Pine tree it was covered with ice and swayed with the icy wind until it was bent over like a gigantic letter U. It hovered like that over our home all night long. We evacuated our second floor bedrooms and chose the family room to hunker down for the night.

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